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The White House Prom for Policy Nerds

The White House Prom for Policy Nerds

The White House Working Families Summit was the biggest thing to happen here in ages for the circle of women’s rights advocates in which I orbit.   So many things about it were right – a sense of jubilation, a racially and ethnically diverse group of attendees, a variety of ages, income levels, and a good [...]

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“A Little Bit of Credit”…. For Dad

“A Little Bit of Credit”…. For Dad

Mark Tyler and I  have been talking about the ups and downs of being the at home parent.  I asked him to write a post about his experience.  After several weeks of writing between bouts of  cooking, cleaning, hugging, story-telling, dressing, playing, undressing, bathing, brushing, combing, driving, picking up and putting away, he sent me [...]

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Women Power the US Economic Engine

Women Power the US Economic Engine

I wrote this piece for The Shriver Report, where it appeared originally on April 7, 2014. One of the biggest stories of the past 50 years has been the movement of women into the paid workforce in unprecedented numbers. The income mothers and wives bring home has changed how we live, what we buy, and [...]

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Fade to Grey at the New York Times

Fade to Grey at the New York Times

Last week, the first female Executive Editor of the New York Times, Jill Abramson, was fired.  It was not an elegant dismissal.  Immediately rumors began to swirl about Ms. Abramson’s supposed discovery that her compensation was lower than her predecessor’s. Then the twitterati batted about reported charges that she was “brusque”, abrasive, and lacking in [...]

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Lean On Me

Lean On Me

My new friend and sister in the trenches is Shay Chan Hodges, the author of Lean On and Lead, Mothering and Work in the 21st Century Economy, which presents new perspectives on families and the future of work through a collection of twenty-six interviews and deep-diving interactive data.  The primary thesis of Lean On and Lead is that [...]

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A Long Time Comin’…

A Long Time Comin’…

Ladies, we are in serious trouble here. In the annual ranking of 133 countries around the globe on the issue of gender equality, the U.S. once again fails to make the top 10. Or the top 20. We may be the world’s only remaining super power, but women are worse off here, according to the World Economic [...]

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Women In, Then Out, of Business

I’m going to be talking to a roomful of women getting their MBA’s this week, and I’m afraid I don’t have a lot of good news for them. True, they are in an elite group of about the one-third of  Americans with undergraduate degrees. They will outnumber their male counterparts when they receive their masters [...]

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Why Women Are More Likely To Be Poor

I spend more time than I’d like talking policy with people who will never in a million years agree with me.  I suppose that’s an occupational hazard in my line of work.  Sticking up for a position is no way to avoid conflict, but I’ve learned to live with disagreement, listen to contrary opinions, say [...]

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So Much More Than the “Right Thing” To Do

My colleague and great friend Sarah Bibler wrote this week’s post.  She’s an expert in how gender issues fit into a nation’s economic growth, and how U.S. foreign policy can do both good and ill for women around the world. She turns her focus towards the U.S. in this piece, and explains how we could [...]

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Facts is Facts

I was reminded of the very many reasons I do this work at the 25th anniversary party of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research a few weeks ago – part briefing, part swanky catered wonk-fest, it was the best of both worlds. It’s easy to see that we need data on women and every aspect [...]

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