Abortion Legislation and the New Congress

The new Congress has immediately taken up several pieces of legislation which will restrict women’s ability to obtain safe abortions in certain circumstances and change the current law in several significant ways. Policy watchers were surprised by the speed with which the Republican majority in the House brought reproductive rights to the fore, because the [...]

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Women & Girls and the President’s Budget

Valentine’s Day ushers in the most unromantic topic of the federal budget this year, and President Obama’s proposed spending plan has now been unveiled. Much wrangling and intense debate is surely in store, and it’s anybody’s guess what the final product will be. Your (Wo)Man in Washington flips straight to the summary of expenditures pertaining [...]

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Competitive Mothering Takes a Hit

With an eyebrow firmly raised at all the Tiger Mother brouhaha, I was delighted to find this post from Cameron Mcdonald, an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She’s written a book, “Shadow Mothers: Nannies, Au Pairs and the Micropolitics of Mothering” which looks as what she calls the “private to public [...]

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Who is in charge of your maternity care?

Womens Enews reports that maternity wards and obstetric units are closing across the country. Depending on where you live, and whether or not you have health insurance, you could be far away from the medical care you need. The number of babies born in the US has remained stable, at just over 4 million a [...]

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A Gender Revolution in Economics

Last week I saw a column in Market Watch written by Paul Farrell, about impending changes in access to wealth and power. It’s a fascinating theory and I’ve been preoccupied by it for a week. What do you think? Capitalism is moving closer to a final meltdown,a catastrophe much worse than the shaking of markets [...]

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Part-Time Work; Still Just for Women?

One factor limiting women’s economic security is the approach to part-time work in the US. It has the reputation of being poorly paid (true), mostly done by students, (false), and performed by those who don’t really depend upon the income (also false). Part-time workers do not receive the protections of numerous state and federal laws, [...]

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The 112th Congress – Still an Old Boys’ Club

The ladies and gentlemen of 112th US Congress have been sworn in. Do you know how many of them look like you? How many share your experiences and convictions? Do you trust them to make decisions which will shape and influence your life, and your family’s personal and economic security? Would you guess that the [...]

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"It’s Her Choice” – Really?

Your (Wo)Man in Washington is happy to offer this cross-post by MOTHERS founder Ann Crittenden which originally appeared on the MomsRising blog.  Ann takes on the argument that mothers “choose” to work less, earn less, have less, or willingly endure discrimination.  This classic “blame the victim” strategy is often invoked to beat back efforts to [...]

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Put "The Price of Motherhood" In Your Stocking

Put "The Price of Motherhood" In Your Stocking

Seems like only yesterday… …but it was really 10 years ago that Ann Crittenden wrote The Price of Motherhood: Why the Most Important Job in the World Is Still the Least Valued. A special 10th anniversary paperback edition has just hit bookstores, and makes the perfect holiday gift for any and all family caregivers you [...]

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Guest Post – "It’s About Time" by Mindy Fried

I came across this essay by sociologist Mindy Fried about the lack of paid family leave in the US versus how common it is around the world. Also on my mind is the failure of the Paycheck Fairness Act to pass the US Senate this week. I think the two are related. Opponents of the [...]

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